Anglophone journalists mistaken, branded as spies

Journalists in the Northwest and Southwest Regions of the country greatly hit by the ongoing Anglophone crisis, say it is gradually becoming almost impossible for them to do their job effectively and efficiently. They revealed their ordeals to this reporter on Thursday, January 24 in Buea.

They say they are facing trials from many fronts; administration, police and the general public. “It is very difficult now to gather news because access to information has been stiffened more than ever before; even if you get to a source to enquire newsy information that is not even connected to the Anglophone crisis, they are not willing to talk. Everyone is just linking everything to the Anglophone crisis even if it is not connected,” Isidore Abah, journalist and Desk Editor of ‘The Post Newspaper’ Buea lamented.

According to him, most people don’t want to talk at all to the press even on issues that concern them hence, making it very difficult for a journalist now to have quotable quotes. Abah added that even the few who accept to talk, will do so on conditions of anonymity, but he said the challenge is that when one over uses anonymity, the readers tend to doubt one’s credibility as they think the stories are being cooked up in the newsroom by the reporter. He continued, “Also, the police are not helping; when they see a journalist they think he is a spy. In fact, they are always mistaking journalists for spies and it makes it very difficult for information gathering. There’s intimidation too even from officials. They tell you, ‘we don’t want to talk, if we talk you will misquote us and you know what this dispensation means.’ And if somebody requests anonymity, you have to grant their request because it is their right. We must also do so in order to keep the newspaper going given that, alternative sources are not even there we just have to keep digging until we have the information,” he stated.

“I think that journalists are not out to destroy the country, so the military should see journalists as partners in the construction of the republic. It is our right as journalists to bring the societal challenges to the fore. If we don’t say it, people will not understand. It is by doing what we do that Government can step in to better the situation. I am also hoping that journalists don’t give up, but stay positively aggressive.”

The Editor furthered that, it is not easy but they have to keep doing the job because being aware of the fact that it has ever been difficult gaining access to information, his appeal to the Government or the parliament is for them to come up with a bill proposing an information act granting journalists access to information. A bill, he said, he is certain will go a long way to help journalists nationwide.

On her part, Relindise Ebune of ‘The Rambler Newspaper’ Buea recounted how the news gathering process is getting more difficult by the day. She said even the news events that used to happen have drastically reduced as she has discovered that people are now scared of organizing any news-making event in a place like Buea due to insecurity. “Remember that it is sometimes from these news events that one gets other news ideas but, that is no longer the case. There is news drought and if one tends to rely on public events, then there will be no news.

  “An official during a recent public event which recorded a very low attendance whereas it was a meeting which ought to have brought together participants nationwide told us that, participants from Yaounde had even proposed that the meeting be hosted in Douala because to them, Buea is a war zone but, they insisted and hosted it in Buea and the turnout was really discouraging. If it was taken out of Buea, it means, the journalists in Buea would have had no news to cover,” Ebune noted, proposing that the many obstacles preventing journalists West of the Mungo from effectively executing their duties can only be surmountedif a solution to the socio-political crisis plaguing this part of the country is found soonest.

By Nester Asonganyi

How war victims are adapting to bush life

“Life is gradually becoming very normal for those who fled into the bush especially in Munyenge, in the Southwest Region due to unrest and insecurity that has highly hit their area,” says a Cameroonian youth. For almost a year now living in the bush, Oforka Rebecca a 24 year old lady recounts how they fled into the bush and how life has been for eight months now.

“Military people have settled in our area and there are constant shootouts between warring parties, endangering the lives of natives, so we ran into the bush. One Sunday morning we were home and suddenly heard as people were heading to our village. We were not even aware of their mission or motive but we just ran into the bush. After that they came and were burning houses because they wanted to make their camp in Munyenge. Documents of people were burnt, houses as many were rendered homeless even at the moment,” she narrated.

Oforka added: “They were shooting to scare off people so that they could establish. Their reason, according to what we heard was that they got information that our land is a training ground for ‘Amba boys’ but which is not true. Even though the boys are actually in Munyenge, the truth is, they live far away in the bush and only come out when they want to operate.  Most of us don’t even know where they live particularly because they don’t even permit people to go close to them except if one is a member of their group.

“Bullets were flying over our heads while we were even scampering for safety into bushes.”

How life was during the first month in the bush

“It really wasn’t easy for the first one to two months living in the bush. During that period, life was just so tough, as many fell ill and died since our bodies were still to adapt to that of regular animals in the bush; no good source of drinking water, mosquito bites but gradually life became very normal.

Life at present in the bush

“Life in the bush at the moment is even better than our houses to the extent that even if we are asked to go home, we would even prefer the bush.All activities that took place normally in the village also take place in the bush. People do their businesses only in the bushes. They buy from Muyuka and sell in the scrubland, and others do their traditional marriage there, birthday celebrations just to name but these.

“We also have mosquito nets that were provided by the Government before the crisis, so we took them to the bush and built our small huts since we cultivate mostly cocoa. We put our mattresses on ovens designed to dry cocoa and sleep.

“We also have cocoa buyers who stay with us and buy cocoa then transport to Douala. There are tailors, shoe menders, we go to church and do everything as in the village.

How marriages are done in the wild

Questioned on how marriages are carried out in the bush, she stated that if a man and woman wish to get married, the two families meet, if they approve the union, they then organize a small area still in the bush where people will meet, eat and drink and life moves on normally. The only difference from home according to Oforka is potable drinking water because we just have but small streams which farmers used to use to spray their cocoa but we now use it as a source of drinking water. So most us do suffer from malaria and typhoid which is being caused by our surroundings and poor hygienic methods.”

Health units in the bush

“We also have small health units. The nurses and doctors who were with us before the war also ran into the bush and have built small health centers were people visit when sick or for child birth, except when the cases are bad that they are referred to the hospitals in the towns. The hospital bill is also very expensive and the absence of a medical laboratory to run tests makes life difficult because for complex situations which require that a test be done, they are referred to hospitals in town.”

Number of deaths and unfriendly surrounding

“We have recorded cases of snake bites because of the surrounding and the lack of electricity since we use but bush lamps at night. Snakebites are very common and almost inevitable in our area. We have been in the bush now for about eight months and about 20 people have died while in the bush. A majority of them died and there was no means taking them to the village so most of them were buried in the bush but when it is possible for burial to take place in the village, we go bury the corpse then do the entertainment in the bush.”

Natives caught in the web of military and Amba

“Apart from the military we also face challenges with the ‘Amba Boys.’ They are noted for suppressing farmers. They demand huge sums of money from poor farmers. They demand high amounts from those they think have money, for others who have their bush guns, they forcefully take their guns, but we are gradually coping with them.

“We are caught up in the web of the military and ‘Amba.’ Most often we bewail that it would have been better that we remain and suffer the way we had been before the crisis than running from all fronts, both the military and ‘Amba.’

“Most people are even scared of going back to the village because the military can arrive at any moment and no one knows his or her fate in such situation. There have been times when people ran back and homes were searched, people taken out and killed. That is why most people are scared of going back to the village.

Even though we are being suppressed by ‘Amba,’ if opportunity is given for us to choose between the ‘Amba’ and the military we would choose the ‘Amba’ because they don’t shoot us with guns but the military does and very casually.”

Respect of imposed ‘ghost town’ in the bush

“While in the bush we still do respect ‘ghost town.’ There are days that they will inform us of a three day ghost town dubbed “mami water ghost town” and on such days, we just wake up make our food and eat, then sit in our huts but when it is evening, we can open our market centres.”

On how a common market centre was created in the bush, she stated that it started by the help of a pharmacist who one day displayed drugs on a land belonging to no one and as people saw him; they started building their market sheds which has now become a big market centre. The 24 year old girl added that for those who don’t have land in the bush, they have built their own houses by the market side while others stayed back home alerting those in the farm by phone or ringing of bells whenever the military is around.”

Councilors created to dissolve disputes

She revealed that in the bush, councilors have been created who settle disputes amongst settlers in the bush and that like in towns; they have names of different localities in the bush. Some areas she said have been dubbed Dubai and the market named ‘number one water.’

“We really want the crisis to come to an end because I as an example, my education has stopped for the moment. I pray the Government makes things better for people to live peacefully. Even if we were asked to go back to the village, I don’t even know where we would live because our houses have been burnt down,” Oforka lamented.

By Relindise Ebune

Wide shut window of dialogue

For more than two years now, young Cameroonians, in and out of uniform are being set up to kill one another. In the Northwest and Southwest Regions, a raging war has sent hundreds to early graves. Hundreds of thousands are starving outright; they are out of school or fleeing to the bushes. Soldiers have invariably turned them into objects of target practice.

Those fighting to liberate Ambazonia are kidnapping for ransom, mutilating the limbs of the innocent and looking out for soldiers to kill. Their drum beaters are ruling the social media from the safety of the Diaspora with intimidating edicts and primitive bravado. The regime is tottering, trading power for purpose. The power that it wields is dominating purpose, with performance the worse for it. Billions are daily spent, ironically protecting regime barons against hapless citizens.

A mayor, purportedly voted to office by the people is being guarded by a cluster of heavily armed, trigger-happy soldiers. Years back, Tanzanian head of state and African Union, AU, Chairperson, Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete attended a function in Down Town Dar-Es-Salaam, escorted by two outboard riders and a few policemen in a Land Rover jeep. No streets were shut down because Kikwete was leaving the state house.

Unfortunately for us in Cameroon, the rule of one man has triumphed over the rule of law. He is deified, even infallible to the extent that a pandering varsity don insisted on a prime time television programme that the head of state works at his own pace and according to his own plans and not at the pace prescribed for him by Cameroonians. The professorial popinjay sees nothing wrong with that. So even as Cameroonians insist on dialogue as opposed to a shooting war, and the president at one point insisted: “…dialogue has always been and will always remain the best means of resolving problems,” hardly anything has been done to engage it. And the don’s selective amnesia means dialoguing with the deaf if you will.

As it now stands, we are doomed with a “wide shut” window. Dialogue issues in every speech. It is recited millions of times daily. But the reality is that those whistling this dialogue are play acting, with their dialogue effectively played out with coughing guns and vile propaganda. The same chaps parading the marble corridors of power and are quick to blab about Cameroon Development Corporation, CDC, being the biggest employer of labour after the Government are the same ones stocking the embers of hatred, of war. Elsewhere, their minions pity the beautiful feathers but ignore that dying bird which CDC epitomizes.

Appointed officials that mount roof tops to thank the almighty, are clearly preaching corporate, communal hate; they are playing the ethnic card for ministerial positions. Ironically, when it comes to looting the public treasury, they connive with the same “ethnic enemy.” They are the ones propagating all the sweet pep talk. But when in suits their ego-bloated fancy, they call fellow human beings and compatriots dogs and go Scot free. They are the ones personalizing and invariably turning the security forces against those they purport to be leading … “in the name of the head of state.” But hey!  If one fifth of the Cameroonian population decides that enough is enough, and start resisting obnoxious governance, not even the entire army will restrain them.

The dignity of every player in the Cameroonian equation is certainly very important to the legitimacy of the entire system that a few carpetbaggers have high-jacked. That is the beauty of true democracy; not periodical elections by a clearly manipulated and programmed “selectorate.” Cameroon is in dire need of an intellectual rigour to scrutinize and sanitize the ding dong system. Democracy cannot be limited to a periodical transaction in which an individual is retained, sworn in and appointments made. Democracy is said to have taken place when it is painfully acknowledged that certain things or some specific thing is fundamentally and structurally wrong.

And that is when someone with the mental understanding of what it takes to manage, to fix things steps in auspiciously. Put bluntly, the head of state must have a third ear and re-sharpen his intellectual curiosity. They regime can buy all the sophisticated weaponry but it will not be enough to win a war, especially one that was rather tactlessly declared. Cameroonians need to sit down, talk and plan together, not like the crooning professor professes on television shows for parochial interest. We need to have our windows, all of them, wide open, not “wide shut,” for the fresh air of democratic governance to blow in.

But should the head of state elect to have Trump’s impregnable wall of concrete around him, then, he would have been limited to just one window through which he peeps. The time to cultivate intellectual reflexes, not just banking on the theatrics of the likes of Issa Tchiroma when he arrogated to himself the role of the regime’s songbird for a small fee is now. It is trite knowledge that only when you marry, do you realize that a boyfriend isn’t a husband or that a wedding ceremony doesn’t in any way constitute a marriage.

The mystic of power in today’s world has diminished on account of mutating knowledge and technology. Consequently, we can’t any longer spin concepts and slogans, then have talking crickets like Tchiroma transform them into slogans and weapons and expect 20th Century Cameroonians to stupidly swallow the yarn “scoop, line and sinker.”

And now this…

Conversation must happen. It will happen, no matter how long hawks delay it. Restructuring for the general, as opposed to selective good, is tantamount to the intellectual reconstruction of the Cameroonian mind. The rational part of our brain has been switched off by manipulators, who are naturally hoping hoping for the war in Anglophone Cameroon to continue because they are reaping pecuniary benefits from it.

Mr. Biya, invest emotionally in this Anglophone problem and solve it without skirting around.

Cheers and let’s keep suffering and smiling!

By Charlie Ndi Chia

Forgive VISION 4’s ‘press passes’

It wasn’t a secret. The late Jean Forchive, was the Government’s hangman. He was mourned on dry cheeks because of how he dealt ruthlessly and summarily with regime dissidents. I was his unwilling guest on a couple of occasions. He told me in Pidgin English: “I fit finish with you.” It was a frightful, chilling experience!

 My crime was to have asked Mr. Biya how the very gendarmes that voted 99 percent for him could turn their guns on him barely two weeks after election results were proclaimed.

The New York based Committee to Protect Journalists, CPJ, was three years old at the time. CPJ fought for my release. CPJ has been consistent on its fight for free media worldwide and defending the rights of journalists to report news without fear of reprisal. Unfortunately, CPJ has so far been rather conveniently hesitant to draw a line between impostors, “Journalists Iscariot” and professional journalists imbued with high ethical and deontological standards.

On Tuesday, July 18, 2017, I was at the New York headquarters of the CPJ where we debated issues of freedom of expression and media regulation. It was stormy, with yours truly challenging the CPJ for advertently defending criminals purporting to be journalists. I suggested to my New York hosts that CPJ practically prays for any mindless scribbler to run into trouble so that the committee has work to do.

This brings me to a certain scandal house of communication, aka ‘VISION 4’ and the dreadful tripe and treacle it has been spewing, often with the blessing of nebulous judicial artifice. Note that the latest sleaze ‘VISION 4’ broadcast was the purported death of Gabonese President, Ali Bongo. ‘VISION 4’ Invited to tell their own side of the story, ‘VISION 4’ snubbed the National Communication Council, NCC, invitation. They were served a relatively mild sanction, hardly commensurate with its diffusion of fake news and disregarding constituted authority. As usual, the “bawdy house,” including hirelings on its payroll ranted like ants while heaping invectives on the NCC.  Even when it was proven beyond all reasonable doubts that Bongo was alive, ‘VISION 4’ neither retracted nor apologized.

Besides ‘VISION 4’s’ latest brainlessness, the TV station is noted for systematically devoting hours of hate speech, with muckrakers referring to some Cameroonians as cockroaches and rats good to be fumigated. This media outfit is noted for cheap rant and cant, including broadcasting pictures of a nude professor in the name of journalism. Their warped idea of press freedom is shared by quite a good number of busybodies and wannabes.

As far as this class of people goes, journalists are above the law. Journalists can publish seditious libel and go Scot free. Journalists are free to destroy the good name of any institution or individual, unchecked by any social legislation or laws. In short, journalism in their view is the art of criticizing, even denigrating everyone else without recourse to legality. That is why ‘VISION 4’ expects to be hailed when the outfit broadcasts pictures of nude or calls individuals unprintable names on air. That is why when some other television station screens gory pictures of decapitated human bodies and is sanctioned, cringing inconsequential lobbyists must turn up, draw the attention of Western vested interests and decry press censorship. For people of their ilk, it is either their way or the highway.

Certain other points that I raised at the New York meeting with officials of the CPJ included why it was that after the bombing of the Twin Towers next door to the headquarters, not a single one of the thousands of dead people was shown on an American television Channel. I asked why it was that even at the level of the “permissive” social media, Americans were wary of posting gory pictures or even using insulting language on presumed opponents or enemies. And why was the CPJ always so quick to defend proven gangsters, especially in African countries that were pretending to be journalists?

The good thing was that we agreed that all journalistic freedoms have limits; that limitations on free speech have to be legitimate and proportional. No doubt, Cameroon’s National Communication Council has all along been operating within this context. Understandably, norms are created within individual countries. How laws are interpreted would be up to peculiar jurisprudential options. Sometimes they are poorly or deliberately wrongly interpreted, depending on the tastes, preferences, idiosyncrasies or gullibility of the presiding judge. I suspect this to have happened when ‘VISION 4’ celebrated with idiotic fanfare the fact that Peter Essoka, NCC President was jailed after the media outfit was duly sanctioned.

Lest we forget, relative freedom of speech or media came to Cameroon like a spurt. Journalists and ordinary citizens alike were shocked to the reality of what is meant to discuss and publish issues freely and so preyed on the freedom like locusts on a maize farm, ravishing it. To the extent cocktail journalists like we have at ‘VISION 4’ thought they could justifiably glorify hate speech and insurrection on the pages of newspapers or on airwaves.

Last Line…

Imagine family members of the senator/varsity don zapping to ‘VISION 4’ only to see their husband and dad being paraded stark naked. Imagine Bongo’s family members getting the announcement on ‘VISION 4’ that the president of Gabon had died. Imagine a bona-fide Cameroonian citizen being labeled on television as a cockroach and rat. And Tchiroma, minister of Communication as he then was, turns up at the very station to congratulate the local version of ‘Radio Mille Colline’ for “doing a great job…” Then I ask you, ‘who then, is responsible for ensuring that the media is honest and is telling the truth? Whose responsibility it is to ensure that the legal bar to establish inciting violence is absolutely high?

‘VISION 4’ may be flamboyant in their buffoonery, but we could still forgive them their press passes.

By CHARLIE NDI CHIA

Why they are fuelling a war without end

Prior to and on December 31, 2018 many Cameroonians were all ears and speculating. They hoped that Biya’s traditional address to the nation would calm tested and frayed nerves and end the stupid two year long war in which uncountable lives have so far been lost and the economy mangled. Biya loyalists eventually, expectedly hailed his address which they said reflected the president’s “wisdom and deft approach to governance.”

But the teeming masses, especially those directly affected by the war thought otherwise. As far as they go, Biya and his advisers have been tactlessly intransigent. Biya’s threat to “neutralize” militants who didn’t drop their weapons was a thoughtless riot act, very unnecessary at a time the country was steadily buckling under, with countless of her teeming youths either killing or being killed. Biya, they insisted, ought to have been fatherly, softer, especially considering that his iron fist approach to solving the problem is hurting everyone else, including teeming Cameroonian masses in general and the soldiers and civilians being mowed down like disposable animals.

A public affairs analyst noted that the intractable nature of the conflict would have been mitigated, had regime hawks not been fuelling and deriving direct socio-economic gains from it. According to him, claims by Ambazonian separatists notwithstanding, the situation has been further worsened by bad governance, epitomized by social injustice across the board, maladministration and intolerance.  He said that resorting to denial, time buying and heaping of resources on propaganda was merely postponing the evil day. “You don’t solve a problem by pretending that it doesn’t exist.” Rather, he noted, it is often advisable to invite the complainant, sit down with them and put the cards face up on the table. Papering visible cracks and forming money guzzling commissions is tantamount to playing the proverbial ostrich, he warned.

The Rambler investigations revealed that rather than douse the raging fire of war, Biya’s vow to exterminate militants intensified the latter’s resolve to fight on. A source said that some 40 Ambazonian militants out of an estimated three thousand have so far surrendered to the disarmament commission which Biya created late last year. Some others are said to be still considering how and when to negotiate safe access to the commission. The 40, we learnt, are being debriefed somewhere in Bali.

On the other hand, limited sections of the population are reportedly cooperating with the regular army entrusted with the mission of routing or “neutralizing” the rebel fighters. The reason we got is that the biting effects of the ‘ghost towns’ on the people, the kidnappings and extortion of ransoms plus other acts of incivility on the part of the militants is turning the tables of trust from “faceless liberators” to a “visible elements of law and order.”

But the military, who themselves have on occasion gone berserk, raping, killing, looting and burning homesteads are not having it easy defeating the militants outright. Relatively, they are still having a hell of a time containing the determined “Amba boys” on the one hand and completely winning the confidence of the people on the other. This is further explained by the fact of people saying that “Biya’s New Year address was a mere babble. That it were best he kept quiet instead of saying the things that he said in the address. According to this class of individuals, “the war would be fought to the end and won.”

Meanwhile, the Northwest, like most of the Southwest Region is almost in complete shutdown. Only two Sub-Divisions out of the many in the Region are still functional in the true sense of the word. They are Bamenda l and Santa. Roads have been dug up, bridges destroyed and other vital infrastructures ruined. Most school gates remain tightly shut.

Elsewhere, administrative buffoonery and other forms of ineptitude continue to be perpetrated. Certain government officials are busy fanning the embers of war with a naïve view to being seen as punishing “enemies of the state.” They take ridiculous decisions that include denying access to food and other forms of basic assistance to detainees connected with the Anglophone crisis. An example is that of the charity going by the name Ayah Foundation, known to have taken succour to refugees in most parts of the English speaking Regions and Nigeria. But at the Yaounde Maximum Security Prison where about a thousand of the people are being detained reportedly under poor conditions, the provisions were rejected by prison officials and foundation members ordered to beat a hasty retreat.

Other reports talk of sleazy practices, whereby some local administrators and elected municipal authorities have been stealing relief materials, including food items, while those for whom the government destined the items are pining away at internally displaced people’s camps and in the bushes.

Any how one looks at the situation; it becomes only clear that many top brass are ironically working for the war to continue and not the other way round. Because they are benefitting from the misfortune of fellow citizens in many ways.

By Charlie Ndi Chia

Sani Abacha: Anatomy of a sadist, dictator

“I quietly walked in and saw the body of General Abacha wrapped in white cloth and laid in a small private sitting room in the residence. And I said to myself, “vanity upon vanity.” His death to me was as dramatic as his ascendancy to power, equally evoking tragic memories of a nation that was unsafe of itself.”
Ogbonaya Orji, a seasoned broadcast journalist who covered ‘Aso Rock,’ Nigeria’s Presidential Palace summarises the ephemeral nature of power in the above statement after he watched the lifeless body of the tin god being exposed like the cadaver of a disease-ridden animal declared unfit for human consumption by veterinarians.
Like Abacha, other “natural leaders” in Egypt, Zimbabwe, Burkina Faso and Ethiopia refused to come to terms with the transient nature of power and fell from it like overripe, nay, rotten mangoes. The lure of power and perks that surround the authority it generates derailed them into the erroneous belief that such reverie could last for eternity.
Abacha incarnated the very essence of power. He participated in several coups d’état before he actually ascended the Supreme Commandership of the Nigerian Armed forces in 1993. His stay in the army up to the time of his swearing in as Head of state was a product of serendipity. Like other cunning, sneaky political spiders elsewhere in Africa, the not so brainy Abacha schemed, bided his time.
Sheer bravery and commitment to purpose endeared him to his superiors and, in particular General Theophilus Yakubu Danjuma, then Army Chief of Staff, who, through a special dispensation permitted him to ascend the rungs of senior officer. As head of state, Abacha looted billions of dollars from the state treasury. He hanged human rights activists and jailed everyone with a dissenting voice for life. Obasanjo, who became first civilian head of state following his demise, served time in Abacha’s gulag.
His reign of terror will remain indelible in the minds of several generations who saw in him an unrepentant and irredeemable autocratic dinosaur.
When he died, Nigerians mourned him on dry cheeks; in fact, they poured into the streets in celebration. The story told in our inner pages reads like the “anatomy or framework of a sadistic dictator.” It is a collector’s item.

Malingo Street man electrocuted

The cobweb of cables criss-crossing the average Buea neighbourhood took toll on at least one unfortunate resident last weekend. The victim, popularly known simply as Pa Collins, was electrocuted after he came into contact with a live high tension cable. An aluminum ladder which he was struggling to bring down from a story building at the popular Malingo Street caused the electrocution.
Eyewitnesses reported that the deceased couldn’t differentiate ordinary domestic cables which are normally insulated from the domestic ones directly supplying power to homesteads. Hence, his electrocution.
Pa Collins was reportedly with his son, carrying out some work at the uncompleted building. According to eyewitnesses, who claimed to have been drinking hard by when tragedy struck bar, they said, they saw the late man and his son were struggling to bring down a ladder which appeared to be too large and long to pass through a narrow door. They said the deceased decided to push the ladder away from the building in order to have ample space, for it to go through the door. But little did they know that the said ladder was leading him to death as the high tension cable, came into contact with it and killed him instantly.
In an attempt to save his dying dad Pa Collin’s son also received a heavy shock. He fortunately survived, but is now battling for his life in hospital. The military arrived with weapons some few minute’s later, which was of no use for the liberation of the victim, while ENEO arrived almost an hour later, to liberate the already dead man.
According to Paul Ndze who identified himself as a Malingo landlord certain people opt to construct their homes with scant regards for safety. According to him, buildings are supposed to be built at least six meters away from high tension lines. But this isn’t the case in a town like Buea where both residents and the electric power supply company are corrupt and careless, hardly respecting building regulations.
By Atembeh Ngewung Lordfred

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SWELA urges Les Brasseries to employ more Anglophones

The deputy secretary for the Southwest Elites Association, SWELA, in charge of Meme Division has urged the authorities of Cameroon’s leading brewing company Les Brasseries du Cameroun in Kumba, to employ more Anglophones in the enterprise, so as to make them feel the presence of the economic giant in their midst.
Prince Daniel Nasako made the call on Friday, March 23, 2018, during a handing over awards ceremony in recognition of the support the company has been contributing towards the promotion of culture, peace, education, sports and humanitarian work.
He acknowledged that the company has proven its worth in the support of education and other activities, especially to the youths but regretted that Anglophones working in the company could be counted within seconds.
“We of SWELA acknowledge that much work has been done, but urge you to recruit more Anglophones to break the imbalance that exists and also in a way resolve the vexation of youths who often complain that companies in their Region recruit more of Francophones.”
In response, the laureate Ms. Nchinda Evelyn Ngwe Tita, Chief of Commercial Services, Kumba, while thanking the association for recognizing their efforts especially in the promotion of education and humanity, said the worry of employing more Anglophones is already being taken care of by management.
“I am so overwhelmed by such recognition. This award is coming to Meme, which means it is coming to us here. It is very symbolic to us because it is not easy to give your all and see people who come back to say thank you. With regards to their plea, it is is already in line with the strategy of the company. The General Manager himself acknowledges the fact that more Anglophones are needed for a balance. It will obviously come but in a gradual process.”
She, however used the opportunity to advised youths to drop their applications at the company website so that when need arises they could be called up to be employed.
By NGENDE ESTHER