Of Nyamnding and professorial morons

That the regime in Etoudi corrupts almost everything it touches may now sound like a hackneyed song. But every passing day unfolds the proof thereof. Be it formally through its failed policies or informally through the daily deeds and utterances of its apologists, the regime never fails to demonstrate that if there is anything like the direct opposite of the Midas touch, they have it. The bestiality with which they have been prosecuting this hateful war against Southern Cameroons shows beyond a shred of doubt that they have no dram of respect for life, let alone the human values that form the bedrock of any civilised society.
The one plausible diagnosis of all the symptoms we see is systemic brain damage which has now reached epidemic proportions.
What else would prompt a parliamentarian to declare in session, and on camera, that he asked his son who is a colonel in the army to “kill at least 30 Anglophones”? How else would a member of Government go on record as saying that Anglophones had been dissolved like two cubes of sugar in a basin of water? Or that a population of some eight million is an insignificant minority in a country of about 25 million. The list of such senseless utterances is long, and the unfolding of things on the ground has so proven their emptiness that all they deserve is a dismissive smile.
The latest in the series is a certain Professor Nyamnding‘s hogwash about Anglophones being ungrateful and dull. According to him Southern Cameroonians have always been undeservedly admitted to the regime’s so-called “Grandes Ecoles” thanks to a special derogation ordered by Biya.
Normally, Nyamnding and his claptrap don’t deserve to be dignified with a single comment. But we learn that he teaches International Relations, meaning he is in a position to propagate this falsehood even beyond the frontiers of Cameroon.
For starters though, he has demonstrated that he is indeed a professor – he has professed his emptiness – his ignorance of facts and lack of tact – which is an indictment of a system that produced him and his likes. Elsewhere he is reminded of the many Southern Cameroons students in these schools who, taking their notes in French, very often end up topping their classes. We have nothing to prove in this respect.
Don’t ask him why Yaounde is sacrificing so many soldiers in the fight to keep them, if they are nothing but a bunch of ne’er-do-wells? What has Yaounde got to lose in the departure of a tribe of morons when it is left with so many more intelligent tribes (Beti, Douala, Bassa and Bami)? They should be celebrating the happy riddance. Or are they needed as cheap hewers of wood and drawers of water?
But those who can read between the lines would know that it is more the abusive groom’s fear of losing the dowry the unwilling bride brought with her into the marriage.
Nyamnding’s definition of intelligence can only reflect what obtains in the intellectual bubble in which he was raised. Yaoundé’s system of education was designed to produce, not genuine intellectuals with demonstrable probity, but local robots programmed to think, say and do what the designer wants.
It is a garbage-in-garbage-out system that has reduced a university degree to a piece of paper, a robe and a mortarboard, all obtained as a reward for reproducing some trainer’s plagiarisms. We speak here of the general rule, recognising that there are a few genuine intellectuals lost, like gold rings, in these trusses of hay.
That is why in Cameroon we have so many uneducated professors, incapable of thinking, let alone teaching anyone to think, out of the box.That, in consequence, is the reason most Southern Cameroonians who go through these system schools always get into trouble when they insist on understanding and analysing concepts – as part of Anglo-Saxon scholarship practice – instead of just reproducing notes to pass exams.
Admission into and graduation from the schools he cites are controlled by a gatekeeping system that favours the programmable and, of course, those who can buy their way through. The corrupt mind-set cultivated in these schools is one of Cameroon’s biggest curses.
One wonder’s if, for people like Nyamnding, the real fear is not that if these so-called Anglos are allowed to slip away, they could produce a real system of education that would expose the vacuity of the present one.
In that case he and his likes must be having nightmares watching the number of French speaking parents already scrambling to send their children to English speaking schools, and feeling so proud when they succeed in getting admission. You can’t compare one thing, you know.
But to better grasp where people like Nyamnding are coming from, here are two accounts from two Southern Cameroonians in the University of Yaounde.
“In the Grande Ecole where I was teaching it was decided that each student’s script be marked by two or more lecturers, ostensibly to avoid lecturers awarding undeserved marks to students. A francophone colleague marking some francophone scripts after me, suddenly became uncontrollably furious with the students on realising that I had corrected their French as well. “Your French is so bad that even an Anglophone can correct you. I can’t believe it,” he said, really upset.
In the second case an Anglophone student doing a bilingual degree had written a paper in French, and a French female lecturer decided to fail him because it was too good to have been written by an Anglo.
For her, either he had copied it, or he was a Francophone pretending to be Anglo. She must have had on her Nyamnding tinted glasses.

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