Last kicks of a dying regime

Professor Elvis Ngole Ngole seems to be regretting the fact that he had seemingly atoned for his erstwhile gaffe when he pitched his tent in the camp of those who had refused to acknowledge the Anglophone problem and its poignant existentialist essence for the corporate survival of Cameroon. His dismal outing on Cameroon Calling where he was pontificating as professor of political science evoked the impression of motorcycle rider handling an issue in rocket science. In a desperate attempt to justify the puerile outing of the Minister of External realtions in the matter pitting the American Ambassador against paul Biya, Ngole Ngole chided the former interferring in Cameroon’s internat affairs and even went to the extent of saying tthat Cameron as a sovereign state is legally and ligitimately correct to use any means to subdue insurrection within its territorial confines.
Unfortunately for the man who passes off for Professor, he had set his own question different from what was in issue, which is that the American ambassador’s grouse with the Biya regime was not on the legality or otherwise for it to quell a rebellion that is threatening its territorial integrity. On the contrary the ambassador, being the representative of a country in skies where due process or the rule of law is accorded its deserved primacy, is miffed by the fact that extra judicial killings, burning looting, maiming and even rape had become customary to the manner the regime was proclaiming its unilateral declaration of war against his citizens whose only crime is expression of discomfiture against palpable misrule.
In riposte to the above, some public commentators say the embers of cold war between CPDM genuine and pseudo intellectuals and Cameroonians with integrity should be stoked. By their reckoning, the protagonists are seeking strategic positions to facilitate accession to power given that Biya’s exit is already immutable. However, such hypothesis tends to diminish the strong presence of world acclaimed intellectuals like Achille Mbembe who have been clamouring for the departure of Mr. Biya and shining light on his horrendous misrule over the years for no other reason than altruism. His recent outing on the excesses of the regime, particularly, its reaction to chiding cum counseling by the United States of America via its Ambassador to President Biya is very telling. In his opinion, the best option for Mr. Biya is to make peace with the Americans and seek a peaceful exit from power rather than the perilous trajectory into which his hawks are pushing him.
Be that as it may, there is every reason to opine like Achille Mbembe and many other Cameroonians. Prevailing circumstances in the country do not require a crystal ball for the outcome to be discerned. The fall of the Biya dynasty is very imminent. Otherwise, how does it happen that a man, be him American Ambassador, with whom Biya was negotiating how to repatriate Cameroonians suspected of stoking the flames of “Southern Cameroon spring” in the US would turn around and instead use euphemism to the effect that Mr. Biya has done his best and it would be ungentlemanly for him to still be seen as wanting to advance his candidacy for the upcoming presidential. No matter the angle from which it is viewed, this is a blow intended to send our head of state to the surgery for some scrotal repair that may not be successful, given the might with which it was inflicted.
We can worry our self to hell and back regarding the territorial infringement undertone of the ambassador’s outpouring, but one thing is certain. We did not cover our flanks and with open flanks every enemy has free entry. Did the head of state and his advisers need the American Ambassador to tell them that what they have embarked upon in the guise of a war against citizens who were simply complaining against incontrovertible evidence of misrule is barbaric and smacks of callousness? Did it need the presence of the ambassador at the Unity Palace for Biya to know that more than 60 villages in the Northwest and Southwest regions have been torched by soldiers acting on the instructions of their high command? For God’s sake the regime should spare us ignominy inherent in this puerile drama being acted for a disinterested audience. We are certainly worth more and by extension deserve better perception in the comity of nations.
Indeed, the impression being evoked by the delirious outbursts of regime apologists only lends credence to the view that their days are numbered and since they cannot continue in their profligate revelry they must leave the country in an orgy of genocidal chaos. Oh yes, this is very evident in the callousness and opulence that panned out from May 20 celebrations in Yaounde. It is certainly not amusing that an old man in the last days of his sojourn on earth still finds pleasure in riding in a car whose cost is the equivalent of at least 10 well equipped Health Centres. And, on top of this, an integral part of the country is enmeshed in wholesale misery inflicted by forces loyal to the regime. This deos not mean anything to the head of state who bandies national unity. The American ambassador had to be the one to remind him that his inept governance has caused no fewer than 25000 Cameroonians to be languishing in refugee camps in Nigeria with another 200000 acceding the repugnant status of internally displaced people.
Mr. President, the American ambassador was simply echoing the fact that your misrule does not fit in a world that has advanced to android and other cutting-edge technology. It will not encourage our youths to come up with the much vaunted start-ups that government expects of them. Mr. President, you do not need the American ambassador to feel for your compatriots who are living in bushes owing to destitution brought into being by marauding soldiers who were supposed to have been their protectors. Mr. President, conventional wisdom would have informed you that cowards stand alive to point at the houses of stubborn heroes. What the American ambassador was politely telling you Mr. President is that you have not only mismanaged the current crisis pitting your regime against separatist Southern Cameroonians but, your tenure as head of state is overdue apart from being unmitigated disaster to Cameroon. What indeed, do you want to achieve that 35 years of free lease on the country has not permitted you?
Mr. President, did you expect respect from the American Ambassador when you had publicly declared that you are the best student of another head of state? Oh, common, spare us all this avoidable disgrace. What the American ambassador is telling you is that call your soldiers to order, make peace with your aggrieved compatriots and exit the political scene very quietly to avoid the wrath of the people that is already gathering and may reach a boiling point any time soon. You said in France in the early 90s that you will want to be remembered as the man who brought democracy to Cameroon.
It is difficult to fathom how what is going on now in the country can be likened to democracy. A war of attrition occasioned by greed, callousness of your regime and inexplicable intransigence is suffocating your compatriots but, you are sticking to your unshakable believe in the use of force. Mr. President, posterity will certainly hold you and your hirelings accountable for the chaos you have inflicted on our heavily endowed country in terms of human and natural resources. Repent and be on the right side of God’s eventual judgement.
By Ngoko Monyadowa

Open letter to GCE Board Chairman

Dear Mr. Chairman
Violation of GCE Board Texts
I write to you in my capacity as
1. The Emeritus founding President of the Teachers Association of Cameroon, TAC
2. The undisputed leader of the Anglophone movement that wrestled the Cameroon Government in 1992-1993 for the creation of the Cameroon GCE Board
3. Member of the Prime Minister’s Committee of reflection on the organization of the GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION, GCE, BOARD
4. The Pioneer Registrar of the General Certificate of Education, GCE, Board
5. Self-proclaimed Examinations Consultant to the GCE Board.
Many Anglophone Cameroonians have floated fears that the Government has plans to transfer the GCE Board from Buea to Yaounde. These fears are based on erroneous decisions taken by your predecessors to move the Board’s Regional Offices in Bamenda into the Regional Delegation for Secondary Education and Yaounde into the Ministry of Secondary Education. The Board’s silence and indifference in responding to matters of concern to the public about the function of the Board seem to bolster these fears. It is common knowledge that for more than 22 years the representatives of teachers and parents on the Council, through whom the teachers and parents can be informed, have made no effort to meet with their peers to educate them on resolutions taken in Council.
I believe that it is your responsibility to dispel these fears and rumours by reminding us that the all-important decree No. 93/172 of 01 July 1993, signed by the Head of State himself, President Paul Biya, states categorically in Article 2(2) that the seat of the GCE Board is in Buea. Only another decree of the Head of State can cause a change of that seat and we have not yet found a reason to suggest that this should happen.

The GCE Board Council
The Council of the GCE Board of which you are Chairman is, by Section II Article 7 of decree No. 112/CABPM OF 12 OCT 1993, the supreme governing body of the Board. Its composition is defined in Article 9(1) to include
i) The Chairperson
ii) The Vice Chancellor of the University of Buea or his representative
iii) One representative of the Presidency of the Republic
iv) One representative of the Prime Minister’s Office
v) One representative of the Minister in charge of Higher Education
vi) One representative of the Minister in charge of Finance
vii) Two Inspectors General of Pedagogy (Secondary General and Technical Education)
viii) The Director in charge of Examinations in the Ministry of Secondary Education or his Deputy
ix) Two representatives of parents
x) Two representatives of teachers
xi) Four representatives of the organizations of private education
This gives a total of 17 Councilors.
Article 9(3) specifies that representatives of parents, teachers and private education shall be elected for a period of 3 (three) years renewable. A closer look at this list tells us that the Government has 9 (nine) Councilors and, if we take the Councilors of private education to be the People’s Councilors, the People have 8 (eight). In a full Council session where decisions are taken by a simple majority the Government will willy-nilly have its way. It will even find it easier if the elections of the representatives of parents, teachers and private education were organized by agents of the Ministry of Secondary Education (RDSE).

The Gentleman Agreements
Mr. S. N. Dioh of blessed memory and I were members of the PM’s committee which drafted this decree and, whether by chance or by design, we were appointed pioneer Chairman and Registrar respectively. Realizing that the text left out the method of election of the representatives of parents, teachers and private education and that, in its current form it could be exploited by ill intentioned administrators to the disfavor of the people, we got the first Council meeting of the GCE Board to enter into what has come to be known as the Gentleman Agreements.
The first of these agreements spelt out the method of election of the representatives of the parents, teachers and private education. Representatives of Catholic Education would be appointed by the Bishops alternating between the Northwest and Southwest Regions while representatives of Protestant Education would alternate between the Presbyterian Church and the Baptist Church. The representatives of the Islamic Faith would be appointed by the corresponding education authorities. Lay Private Education would follow the same alternating procedure. The selection of the parents and teachers representatives was to be the reserve of the Confederation of Anglophone Parent Teachers Association of Cameroon, CAPTAC, for the parents and Teachers Unions for the latter. The method of selection was to be determined by these bodies with the proviso that the two Regions had a balanced representation. The respect of this agreement would ensure that the concerned organizations participate consciously in decisions of the Council of the GCE Board. The responsibility of inviting these various organizations to renew their Councilors every three years and, therefore giving fresh impetus to the Council, is that of the Chairman. When Regional Delegates begin to take it upon themselves to cause councilors to be elected under their supervision it is a travesty and creates an unhealthy environment for you.
The second of the Gentleman Agreements was that the positions of Chairman of the Council and Registrar of the Board would alternate between the Northwest and Southwest Regions. By this agreement no one Region could hold the two positions concurrently. The same applied to the two Deputy Registrars; they had to be selected one from each of the two English Regions.
These two agreements constitute what is known in GCE Board language as the Gentleman Agreements. Although they are unwritten, they have served as boulders to the GCE Board’s texts and have kept the Board running smoothly for the past 25 years. By June 2016, charlatans, pirates et al, started scheming for a share of the Board’s apparent wealth and, finding it hard to enter through the right process, went round the text and the two agreements above. Perhaps, bugged down by these charlatans, the Prime Minister Head of Government, H.E. Philemon Yang invited me to his office on 17th June 2016, for a briefing on the spirit of the Gentleman Agreements.

THE APPOINTMENT OF THE CURRENT REGISTRAR
Mr. Chairman, I welcomed your appointment as the 4th Chairman of the GCE Board, an appointment which conformed to the Gentleman Agreement as did all other appointments before then. However, whilst the Anglophone community which is served by the GCE Board was waiting for your installation and the holding of your first Council meeting which would elect and propose a new Registrar in conformity with Article 21(2) of the PM’s text of application, I was surprised that a new Registrar was installed simultaneously with you. The dust raised by this appointment had not yet settled when I learnt that the Registrar had proceeded with the installation of a Deputy Registrar for Technical Services even before you had had the opportunity to meet in Council to exercise your functions in this respect as required. (I would be doubly surprised if this was done with your blessing).

Election of Parents and Teachers Representatives
I am reliably informed that on Wednesday 23rd May 2018, the Regional Delegate of Secondary Education, RDSE, for the Northwest Region organized elections for representatives of parents and teachers on the Council. This action again violates the GCE Board texts and the long standing and very useful Gentleman Agreement. Should the RDSE for the Southwest Region also proceed with similar elections, the Council will have 13 Councilors for Government and only the 4 representing private education for the People. Mr. Chairman, this is unacceptable.

Conclusion
In total respect for the person of the Prime Minister, I have accepted the appointment of the current Registrar which, as I have stressed, violated Article 21(2) of the text of application, even if it respected the Gentleman Agreement in respect of the Region of origin. But to allow the administration of the Board to take advantage of this action of the PM to perpetuate illegality is totally irresponsible and unacceptable. Therefore Mr. Chairman,
1. I am encouraging the Teachers Unions and CAPTAC to formally elect their representatives to the Council under your chairmanship
2. I am urging you to
a) Reverse all the decisions of the present Registrar which do not conform with the text and the Gentleman Agreement and
b) Declare as inadmissible the elections conducted in violation of the Gentleman Agreement by the RDSE for the Northwest Region and advise his counterpart in the Southwest Region not to fall to the temptation to exercise power which does not belong to him.
Mr. Chairman I believe that such a stance by you will restore public confidence to the Board and its administration. I am consequently taking the liberty to make this message I am addressing to you public because I have written it in the overall interest of the GCE Board to which Anglophones, who I led, sacrificed their all to have created.
Yours truly

Azong-Wara Andrew

Enemies of national cohesion

While the entire country was reveling in respite from the gangrenous war pitting Government forces against Southern Cameroons separatists provided by the now fallacious story of a woman who resurrected five years upon being pronounced dead after a caesarian section in Mbanga under Moungo Division in the Littoral Region, two important events caught this chronicler’s attention.
The first is the blanket ban on sugar importation by the Head of State and the second- the fact that out of bizarre lethargy we have allowed ourselves to become infants or at best primary school pupils who have to be taught the rudiments of self control and survival tactics, in spite of our advanced ages and seemingly impressive academic standings. We are now contented with being managed by Bretonwoods institutions and we make no bones about it to the point where when these creditors are in our country for one working visit or the other, air waves of our audio visual media and pages of regime sponsored newspapers are inundated with swan songs of messianic presence.
Not surprisingly, “therefore, after over 57 years of misrule with the worst of them under the current Head of State and his swaggering CPDM political ruffians, we are shamelessly crying wolf in regard to the presence of spoilers in the country who are jealous of the indivisibility credo that has bound Cameroon together all these years”. Instead of engaging in serious introspection that would have led us to how we found ourselves beggars in the midst of plenty, we are reading mischief making in the activities of those who are daring to say that a people cannot be led by their noses to the slaughter in broad daylight.
In typical Bantu cosmogony, such occurrence would signify the absence of men with balls and chiming bells for the extinction of that generation. But since our motto is “rejoice while the good times last,” we have attributed wrong doing to everybody except the governing class that reckons to have been ordained by God to lord it over the rest of us.
Indeed, it would have been surprising if the country had not reached its current abyss of putrid governance. Take the example of the blanket ban on sugar importation as point of departure and add to it the fact that Government shares in SOSUCAM with plantations in Mbandjock and Nkoteng are not up to 20 percent, which translates easily to the fact that it is essentially foreign-owned. Government contention is that the ban responds to a felt need to protect locally produced sugar that cannot compete favourably with imported brands and by that token exposes many Cameroonians to the fang of looming unemployment. Impressive display of patriotism at face value one would say! However, how much is a labourer paid daily? When was the last time a comprehensive overhaul of their machinery was actualized for the close to 40 years that the sugar company has been operating in Cameroon?
You cannot plant grapes and harvest onions. In essence, their high cost of production must not be borne by hapless citizens. If Government wants to help local companies, it should subsidize them for competition in a world governed by the dictates of demand and supply.
Those who took advantage of inefficient and ineffective business style of local producers to complement and even supplement sugar availability in the country must not be made scapegoats of a deliberate effort to pander to the whims of colonial apron strings. In the face of this and,should the situation deteriorate to the point where workers go on strike and or are laid off because of inability to compete, who would have caused the ensuing social disorder,?
Is it the irate workers or an insensitive Government? Yet they want to be talking down on us about national unity from saintly pedestals. This same situation obtains at the Douala Autonomous Port, CAMRAIL and SOCAPALM where foreigners have a stranglehold on sensitive economic outposts.
And in a country where xenophobia and nepotism have become national pass time, brain wracking issues like availability of sugar in adequate quantities and at affordable prices or the economy being strangulated by foreign domination elude our intellectuals. We are more interested to fight to finish for undeserved promotions by sitting on television and radio panels or pages of newspapers to spew hate among compatriots.
Yes, it is Beti turn to run the affairs of Cameroon. Any attempt to curb Beti hegemony is anathema, despite the blistering misrule to which they have subjected Cameroonians. The credo is that issues of state are not amenable to immediate solutions. From the spectrum of their warped minds, such matters take time to be conceived and implemented. And so with this kind of mindset we have been exposed to over 57 years of contemptible misrule that has lingered to the point where some extremist have opted out of the union.
Over the years, seemingly innocuous issues like equitable revenue allocation based on derivation and devolution of power from the centre to the periphery were turned into rocket science that only political gurus from an outer space institution like ENAM could master. We have all of a sudden been reduced to receptacles that have to swallow hook, line and sinker nebulous notions like indivisibility of Cameroon as if the persistence of misrule and injustice are not in themselves greater ingredients driving the entrenchment of fissiparous tendencies and by extension irredentism in Cameroon. No one in the governing class wants to remember that at the outset two years ago there was a simple request for OHADA laws to be translated into English after which teachers asked for the Anglophone sub-system of education to undergo some overhauling to tally with their aspirations.
On the contrary, the purveyors of what is now sapping Cameroon of all traces of national unity have been rewarded for their provocative and incendiary outbursts before the current crisis deteriorated in the latter part of 2017. The roll call reads like who is who in heaping calumny on Southern Cameroonians. From our own Atanga Nji Paul, Elvis Ngole Ngole and Pauline Nalova Lyonga to Fame Ndongo , Laurent Esso, Isa Tchiroma and other hirelings, the inducements to radicalism had reached unbearable levels and with the radicalization of youths from persistent snobbery by Government, the conflagration has reached a point wherein if care is not taken what happened in Rwanda would have been child’s play. Actually, judging by the hate literature being propagated on social media, by adherents of the separatist Ambazonia republic, something must happen and happen fast for avoidance of a cataclysm.
But the justification being advanced by the separatists is premised on persistent Government incineration of villages in Southern Cameroons that has rendered many homeless and reduced others into refugees in Nigeria and, yet others internally displaced people with scavenging becoming customary to their daily existence. A Government fully aware of its responsibility to cater to the needs of its citizens, they reckon, will not engage in such callousness in the name of fighting separatists. Why, they are wont to ask, is it that soldiers do not comb the bushes in search of suspected separatist loyalists. Instead they raid villages and spray bullets that end up snuffing lives out of many innocent citizens. Yet we expect national unity to prevail. Unity is not an issue that can be decreed. It is worked for and earned like a salary at the end of each month.
By Ngoko Monyadowa