Meme parents unfazed by schools booklist olive branch

Government olive branch to aggrieved parents who had been writhing under the pains of exorbitant demands from the Ministries of Basic and Secondary Education through nebulous textbook prescription which has now been mitigated following Wednesday June 13, 2018 pronouncement of a more friendly policy effective from 2018/2019 academic year by the National Council for the Approval of Textbooks and Didactic materials for Schools, does not seem to have impressed parents in Meme Division of the Southwest Region. The new measures would have generally been welcome if not of the disturbing school situation in most of the Division.
For instance, according to information made public, the prices of the books have been reduced. The number of textbooks per subject has equally been reduced to one, thereby harmonizing the textbooks across the country. Also, for secondary schools, the books chosen are going to stay in the curriculum for a six-year period before any changes can be effected. All these are what parents have longed for, for over a decade now.
But, despite this dream come true, changes put in place by the Government in order to make education affordable to all, parents in Meme Division, one of the most hit in the Southwest by the ongoing crisis say the publication of the textbooks or the reduction of prices will not solve the schooling problems the Division is experiencing, especially at the level of the villages.
According to Cedric Ashutabi, a parent, the changes by the Government is a welcome initiative. He, however, thinks that a lot more needs to be done to see that children in villages who have not had their campuses opened since 2016 go back to school. “To me, having textbooks are not as important as having children go to school. If text books are there and no students to use them, it will be of no benefit to us.” The Government knows exactly what to do to get children back to school,” he said.
Mrs. Ngano Elizabeth, a private primary school teacher who has not been in service since 2016 feels that the necessity for students to be in school is more than that of expensive or many textbooks. She would want the Government to ensure that children across the nation are in school before talking about books to assist them acquire knowledge.
Another parent who opted for anonymity noted: “the Government is aware that we don’t have schools fully operational in our communities but for schools within Kumba. The poor turnout could even be noticed on number of students who registered for public exams. If they are still neglecting the issue and concentrating more on the books then we are into more trouble.”
However, some other parents whose children survived the storm of schooling in Kumba have appreciated the action of the Government relating to the harmonization and price reduction of books.
By NGENDE ESTHER

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